le forum de l'histoire, des mystères, de l'insolite et du féérique
 
AccueilS'enregistrerConnexion

Partagez | 
 

 ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Mar 17 Jan - 22:35





Accusers, Instigators, and Trial Supporters
The vengeful Putnam
Reverend Samuel Paris




Accusateurs, Instigateurs et Supporters des procès
Le vindicatif Putnam
Révérend Samuel Paris













SOURCE :
http://www.legendsofamerica.com
TEXTE EN ANGLAIS ECRIT PAR :
© Kathy Weiser/Legends of America, July, 2012.

_________________


Dernière édition par Lanaelle du Chastel le Jeu 19 Jan - 13:07, édité 2 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Jeu 19 Jan - 12:24




The Putnam House was originally built around 1648 on 100
acres  of farmland owned by Lieutenant Thomas Putnam.
Thomas Putnam, Jr. and Edward Putnam were probably born here. When the elder
Thomas died, it was left to his son Joseph Putman, who would  speak out against the witchcraft hysteria of 1692. Over the years, twelve generations of Putnams have lived there. It was donated  to the Danvers Historical Society in 1991.
Photo courtesy Wikipedia.

La maison Putnam a été construit vers 1648 sur 100
acres de terres agricoles appartenant à lieutenant Thomas Putnam.
Thomas Putnam, Jr. et Edward Putnam sont  probablement nés ici. Lorsque l'aîné
Thomas est mort, il a été laissé à son fils Joseph Putman, qui  se prononcera contre l'hystérie de sorcellerie de 1692. Au fil des ans, douze générations de Putnams y ont vécu. Elle a été remis à la Danvers Historical Society en 1991.
Photo courtesy Wikipedia






Putnam Family Members Involved in the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria:


Ann Putnam, Jr.
Ann Carr Putnam, Sr.
Edward Putnam
Hannah Cutler Putnam
John Putnam, Jr.
John Putnam, Sr.
Jonathan Putnam
Nathaniel Putman
Thomas Putnam, Jr.
Captain Jonathan Walcott
Mary Walcott




Les membres de la famille Putnam impliqués dans l’hystérie de sorcellerie de Salem :


Ann Putnam, Jr.
Ann Carr Putnam, Sr.
Edward Putnam
Hannah Cutler Putnam
John Putnam, Jr.
John Putnam, Sr.
Jonathan Putnam
Nathaniel Putman
Thomas Putnam, Jr.
Le capitaine Jonathan Walcott
Mary Walcott






"I desire to be humbled before God for that
sad and humbling experience that befell
my father’s family in the year about ’92…"

- Ann Putnam, Jr., 1706




«Je désire être humilié devant Dieu pour cette
expérience triste et humiliante qui a frappé
La famille de mon père dans l'année à propos de '92 ... "

- Ann Putnam, Jr., 1706






The old colonial Puritan Putnam family was founded by John and Priscilla Gould Putnam in the 17th century, in Salem, Massachusetts. Originally from Buckinghamshire, England, the family immigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in about 1634. Head of the family, John Putnam, who had been born in 1580, was already in his 50's by the time he immigrated. He had married Priscilla Gould in 1611, and the couple had seven children. Though already grown, some of John and Priscilla's children immigrated with them, including his sons Thomas Putnam, Nathaniel Putnam, and John Putnam. The elder Putnam was well equipped for the work of settling in a new colony, and he and his sons were granted land. Each of his sons would have children of their own, and it would be this third generation of Putnams who would be involved in the witch trial frenzy of 1692. More specifically, it would be the children of his oldest son, Thomas Putnam.



When the colonists arrived at the Massachusetts Bay Colony and settled Salem, they soon found that the land in the immediate vicinity was not fertile and many settlers moved outside the "city" and numerous small farming communities emerged in the area. About five miles north of Salem, was an area that was first known as Salem Farms, where the Putnam family controlled much of the land. Later, it would be called Salem Village. These outer lands surrounding Salem Towne did not have separate identities and the farmers were required to be members of the Church of Salem. However, over time, as settlements began to grow outside the larger community of Salem, some began to break away and form independent towns, the first of which was Wenham in 1643. Desiring autonomy from the larger city as well as their own church, Salem Village began to petition for their independence in the late 1660's. However, the officials in Salem Towne initially refused to grant their independence, which would drive a dangerous wedge between the two communities. Many members of Salem Village began to resent the power that Salem Towne held over them, while those who resided in in the larger community did not feel that this autonomy needed to be granted.



Not only did it create a wedge between the two communities; but, it also separated the village itself, as the farmers began to draw "battle lines" between those who wanted to separate from Salem Towne, and those who did not. However, the farmers continued to make requests, due to the distance from town. Finally, Salem Villagewas granted the right to build their own church and hire a minister in 1672. However, the villagers would officially remain members of the Salem Towne Church, which would govern the smaller parish. The village was also permitted to establish a committee of five, to assess and gather taxes from the villagers - including church-members and non-church members, for the ministry. For the first time, Salem Village had a degree of autonomy




Unfortunately, when Salem Village gained the right to build its own church, it did not solve the problem of the two quarrelling groups; rather, it made it worse. Two families emerged as leaders of the separate factions - the Putnams and the Porters. Both families were early settlers of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, both families had been successful, and both were large land owners in Salem Village.


The Putnams were farmers who followed the simple and austere lifestyle of traditional Puritans. They, along with other farmers in Salem Village, believed that the thriving economy of Salem Towne, and more specifically, thriving merchants, made people too individualistic, which was in opposition to the communal nature that Puritanism mandated. On the other hand, though the Porters derived much of their wealth from agricultural operations, they were also entrepreneurs who developed commercial interests in Salem Towne as well as other areas, and were active in the governmental affairs of the larger community. Due to these differing viewpoints, the Porters' diversified business interests allowed them to increase their family's wealth, becoming one of the wealthiest families in the area. In the meantime, the Putnam family wealth was stagnated.


Making matters worse, in 1672, a Porter owned dam and sawmill flooded the Putnam farms, resulting in a lawsuit brought by the Putnams against the Porters. That very same year, when Salem Village was granted the right to hire a minister and build its own church, the Porters were part of the group who opposed the separation from Salem Towne. Of the 600 some residents of Salem Village, most of the farming families who wanted the separate church and independence from Salem Towne; while those who had closer ties to the city's economy and rich harbors opposed the separation.


Having gained the right to build their own church and gain their own minister, the Putnams also sought to "control" the church, thereby, controlling the community. Heading up this group was Thomas Putnam, Jr., who forged an elite group that would remain in control of the village affairs for years. His allies included his brother, Edward Putnam, brother-in-law, Jonathan Walcott; Walcott’s uncle, the innkeeper Nathaniel Ingersoll, and other Salem Church deacons, committeemen, and church elders.


Having gained the right to its own church and minister, Salem Village soon brought in the Reverend James Bayley in October, 1672, who would stay until 1680, even though the village remained quarrelsome. He was followed up by the Reverend George Burroughs, who would find himself in the midst of the witch hysteria years later; and Deodat Larson, who left in 1688. All three of these ministers had problems with the congregation and ended up leaving under conflict.


In the meantime, many of the villagers continued to hope to separate their church parish from the Church of Salem, and began to search for an ordained minister. In June, 1689 the Reverend Samuel Parris came to the village and began his ministerial duties. On November 19, 1689, the Salem Village church charter was finally signed and the Reverend Samuel Parris became Salem Village's first ordained minister.Salem Village now had a true church. This only intensified the Putnam-Porter conflict.


The differing beliefs of the two factions, along with numerous land feuds continued to divide the village. The division increased on October 16, 1691 when the Porter faction took control of the village committee from the Putnams and their friends. Some of these new selectmen included Daniel Andrew, the son-in-law of John Porter, Sr.; Joseph Hutchinson, one of the sawmill operators responsible for flooding the Putnams' farms; Francis Nurse, a village farmer who had been involved in a bitter boundary dispute with Nathaniel Putnam; and Joseph Porter, Thomas Porter, Jr's half brother. The new committee quickly voted down a tax levy that would have raised revenue to pay the salary of Reverend Parris. This naturally infuriated Thomas Putnam, Jr. and his followers. Embittered, the minister avenged this refusal by proclaiming in his sermons that a conspiracy against the church had been hatched within the village. He even went so far as to assert that the Devil had taken possession of some of the villagers.


In addition to the Porters, Thomas Putman, Jr. also had a lengthy list of other perceived enemies, including the Howe, Towne, Hobbs and Wildes families of Topsfield, with whom he had engaged in land disputes with. Another was John Proctor, who had gained a license for a tavern with the stipulation that he could not sell liquor to locals. This made Proctor's tavern a rendezvous point for "outsiders." It was also in competition with his ally, Nathaniel Ingersoll. Other enemies included Daniel Andrews and Philip English who were closely associated the the Porter family.


It was against this background that the witch hysteria began in early 1692.

The first of the "afflicted girls" was none other than the Reverend Samuel Parris' daughter, Elizabeth Parris, quickly followed by her cousin, Abigail Williams, who also lived in the Parris household. Both began having fits and acting strangely. After several ministers and a doctor looked at the girls, it was decided their afflictions could only be caused by witchcraft. Before long, other young members of the community also began to have fits including Thomas Putman's daughter Ann Putnam, Jr.; his niece, Mary Walcott, and a servant girl who lived in the Putnam household named Mercy Lewis. Since the sufferers of witchcraft were believed to be the victims of a crime, the community set out to find the perpetrators. On February 29, 1692, under intense adult questioning,Elizabeth Parris and Abigail Williams named Sarah Good, Sarah Osborne, and Tituba as their tormentors. These five "afflicted girls" would become the most fervent of the accusers. Further more, the majority of those who were accused were enemies of the Putnams.



By the end of May, 1692, more than 150 “witches” had been jailed and by September, 19 people had refused to confess and were hanged, and another had been pressed to death for refusing to make a plea. By October, 1692; however, cooler heads began to prevail and the court disallowed “spectral evidence.” The affair wouldn't end until May, 1693, when all of the accused were finally released from jail.









La vieille famille coloniale  Puritaine Putnam a été fondée par John et Priscilla Gould Putnam au 17ème siècle, à Salem, Massachusetts. Originaire de Buckinghamshire, en Angleterre, la famille a immigré dans la colonie de Massachusetts Bay aux environs de 1634. Chef de  famille, John Putnam, qui était né en 1580,  avait déjà 50 ans au moment où il a immigré. Il avait épousé Priscilla Gould en 1611, et le couple a eu sept enfants. Bien que déjà grands et installés, certains des enfants de John et Priscilla ont immigré avec eux, y compris ses fils Thomas Putnam, Nathaniel Putnam et John Putnam. L’ainé des  Putnam  était bien équipé pour les travaux dans une nouvelle colonie, et lui et ses fils ont obtenu des terres. Chacun de ses fils ont leurs propres enfants, et ce sera cette troisième génération de Putnam qui sera impliqué dans la frénésie des procès des sorcières de 1692. Plus précisément, ce sera les enfants de son fils aîné, Thomas Putnam.



Lorsque les colons sont arrivés dans la colonie du Massachusetts Bay et s’installèrent à Salem, ils ont trouvé que la terre dans le voisinage immédiat n’était pas fertile et beaucoup de colons allèrent s’installer en  dehors de la « ville » et de nombreuses petites communautés agricoles  sont apparues dans la région. A environ cinq milles au nord de Salem, était un domaine qui fut d’abord connu comme Salem Farms (Fermes de Salem), où la famille Putnam contrôlait une bonne partie de la terre. Plus tard, il s’appellera Salem Village. Ces terres extérieures entourant Salem Towne n’avait pas une identité séparée et les fermiers étaient tenus d’être membres de l’église de Salem. Cependant, au fil du temps, que les colonies ont commencé à croître à l’extérieur de l’ensemble de la communauté de Salem, certaines ont commencé à rompre avec Salem Towne et des villes indépendantes se sont formées, la première d'entre elles était Wenham en 1643.
Désirant une autonomie vis-à-vis de la plus grande ville, mais aussi leur propre église, Salem Village a  commencé à demander son indépendance à la fin  des années 1660. Toutefois, les fonctionnaires de Salem Towne ont initialement refusé d’accorder leur indépendance,  non seulement cela a créé un fossé entre les deux communautés, mais cela divisa le village lui-même, comme les agriculteurs qui ont commencé à créer « des lignes de batailles » entre ceux qui était  pour la séparation et ceux qui ne la voulaient pas.  Toutefois, les agriculteurs ont continué à faire des demandes, en raison de la distance de la ville. Enfin, Salem Village a reçu le droit de construire  sa propre église et d’embaucher un ministre en 1672. Cependant, officiellement, les villageois resteraient membres de l’Eglise de Salem Towne, qui régirait la plus petite paroisse. Le village a aussi  eu la permission de créer un Comité de cinq ans, afin d’évaluer et de recueillir les impôts des villageois - les membres de l’église et les non- membres de l’église - , pour le ministère. Pour la première fois, le Village de Salem avait un degré d’autonomie.


Malheureusement, lorsque le village de Salem a obtenu le droit de construire sa propre église, cela ne résout pas le problème des deux groupes qui se disputent; cela fait plutôt empirer les choses. Deux familles ont émergé comme les dirigeants des factions distinctes – les Putnam et les Porters. Les deux familles étaient les premiers colons de la colonie de Massachusetts Bay, les deux familles avaient réussi, et les deux étaient de grands propriétaires fonciers à Salem Village.



Les Putnams étaient des agriculteurs qui ont suivi le mode de vie simple et austère des puritains traditionnels. Ils ont, avec d'autres agriculteurs dans le village de Salem, estimé que l'économie prospère de Salem Towne, et plus précisément, la prospérité des marchands, rendait les gens trop individualistes, ce qui était en opposition à la nature communautaire Ce Puritanisme d’époque. En revanche, les Porters, dont une grande partie de leur richesse provenait d’opérations agricoles, étaient également  des chefs d’entreprise qui avaient développé des intérêts commerciaux dans Salem Towne ainsi que d’autres domaines et étaient actifs dans les affaires gouvernementales de l’ensemble de la communauté. En raison de ces points de vue divergents, les intérêts diversifiés des Porters leur a permis d’accroître la richesse de leur famille, devenant l’une des plus riches familles de la région. Pendant ce temps, le patrimoine familial de Putnam a stagné.


Pire encore, en 1672, Porter possédait un barrage et une scierie qui a inondé les fermes Putnam, résultat un procès introduit  par les Putnams contre les Porters. Cette même année, lorsque le village de Salem a obtenu le droit d'embaucher un ministre et de construire sa propre église, les Porters faisaient partie du groupe qui s’était opposé à la séparation d’avec Salem Towne. Sur les quelque 600 résidents de Salem Village, la plupart des familles d'agriculteurs  voulaient l'église séparée et l'indépendance de Salem Towne; tandis que ceux qui avaient des liens plus étroits avec l'économie et riches les ports de la ville étaient opposés à la séparation.




Ayant acquis le droit de construire l'église et d’engager leur propre ministre, les Putnams ont également cherché à «contrôler» l'église, et  par conséquence, prendre le   contrôle de la communauté. A la tête de ce groupe, il y avait Thomas Putnam, Jr., qui a forgé un groupe d'élite qui restera dans le contrôle des affaires du village pendant des années. Ses alliés étaient Son frère, Edward Putnam, beau-frère, Jonathan Walcott; L'oncle de Walcott, l’aubergiste Nathaniel Ingersoll, et d'autres anciens diacres de l'église de Salem, des membres du comité  et les ainés de l’église.


Après avoir gagné le droit à sa propre église et à son ministre, Salem Village a bientôt présentée le révérend James Bayley en octobre 1672, qui restera jusqu’en 1680, même si le village a continué à se disputer.  Il a été suivi par le révérend George Burroughs, qui se trouvera plus tard  au milieu des années d’hystérie de sorcière, et Deodat Larson, qui est parti en 1688. Tous les trois avaient  eu des problèmes avec la Congrégation et finiront par quitter sous le conflit.


Dans Le même temps, de nombreux villageois ont continué à espérer séparer Leur église paroissiale de l'église de Salem, et ont  commencé à chercher un ministre ordonné. En Juin 1689, le révérend Samuel Parris est venu au village et a commencé ses fonctions ministérielles. Le 19 Novembre 1689, la charte de l'église Salem Village a finalement été signé et le révérend Samuel Parris est devenu le premier ministre ordonné. Salem Village avait maintenant une véritable église. Cela ne fait qu’intensifier le conflit Putnam-Porter.


Les croyances différentes des deux factions, ainsi que de nombreuses querelles foncières ont continué à diviser le village. La division a augmenté  le 16 Octobre, 1691 lorsque la faction Porter a pris le contrôle du comité de village des mains de la famille Putnam  et leurs amis. Certains de ces nouveaux conseillés municipaux inclus Daniel Andrew, le beau-fils  de John Porter, Joseph Hutchinson Sr., l'un des opérateurs de scierie responsable de l'inondation des fermes de Putnam, Francis Nurse, un fermier du village qui avait été impliqué dans un différend frontalier amère avec Nathaniel Putnam, et Joseph Porter, demi-frère de  Thomas Porter Jr. Le nouveau comité a rapidement rejeté par le vote un impot fiscal qui aurait généré des augmentations de recettes pour payer le salaire du révérend Parris. Ceci a naturellement rendu furieux Thomas Putnam, Jr. et ses disciples. Aigri, le ministre s’est vengé  de ce refus en proclamant dans ses sermons qu’une conspiration contre l'église qui avait été déclarée dans le village. Il alla même jusqu'à affirmer que le diable avait pris possession de certains des villageois.


Outre les Porters, Thomas Putman, Jr. avait également une longue liste d'autres ennemis connus, y compris les familles Howe, Towne, Hobbs et Wildes de Topsfield, avec qui il était engagé dans des conflits fonciers. Un autre ennemi était John Proctor, qui avait acquis une licence pour une taverne avec la stipulation qu'il ne pouvait pas vendre de l'alcool à la population locale. Cela a rendu la taverne de Proctor au point de rendez-vous pour les «étrangers». Il a été également en concurrence avec son allié, Nathaniel Ingersoll. D'autres ennemis incluant Daniel Andrews et Philip English qui étaient étroitement associé la famille Porter.


C’est dans ce contexte que l'hystérie de sorcière a commencé au début de 1692.


La première des «filles affligées» n’était nul autre que la fille du révérend Samuel Parris, Elizabeth Parris, rapidement suivi par sa cousine, Abigail Williams, qui vivait également dans le ménage Parris. Les deux ont commencé à avoir des crises et à agir étrangement. Après que plusieurs ministres et un médecin aient examiné les filles, il a été décidé que leurs afflictions ne pouvaient être causée que par la sorcellerie. Peu de temps après, d'autres jeunes membres de la communauté ont également commencé à avoir des crises, y compris la fille de Thomas Putman, Ann Putnam, Jr. Sa nièce, Mary Walcott, et une servante qui a vécu dans le ménage Putnam nommé Mercy Lewis. Étant donné que les personnes souffrant de sorcellerie étaient soupçonnés d'être les victimes d'un crime, la communauté a entrepris de découvrir les auteurs. Le 29 Février 1692, lors d’un questionnement  intense des adultes, Elizabeth Parris et Abigail Williams ont nommé Sarah Good, Sarah Osborne et Tituba comme leurs bourreaux. Ces cinq «filles affligées»  deviendront le plus ferventes des accusatrices. De plus, la majorité de ceux et celles qui étaient accusés étaient des ennemis des Putnam.


À la fin du mois de mai 1692, plus de 150 «sorcières» avait été emprisonné et en Septembre, 19 personnes avaient refusé d’avouer et ont été pendues, et un autre avait été pressé à mort pour avoir refusé de se défendre en justice. En Octobre 1692, cependant, les têtes froides ont commencé à l'emporter et le tribunal a rejeté les "preuves spectrale.» L'affaire ne serait pas finir jusqu'en mai 1693, lorsque tous les accusés ont finalement été libérés de prison.

_________________


Dernière édition par Lanaelle du Chastel le Jeu 19 Jan - 13:14, édité 1 fois
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Jeu 19 Jan - 12:28

Putnam Family Members Involved in the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria:
Les membres de la famille putnam  impliqués dans l’hystèrie de sorcellerie de Salem.



Ann Putnam, Jr. (1679-1716) - Twelve year-old Ann Putnam, Jr. played a crucial role in the witchcraft trials of 1692 as one of the first three "afflicted" children. Born on October 18, 1679 in Salem Village, Massachusetts, she was the eldest child of Thomas Putnam and Ann Carr Putman. She was friends Elizabeth Parris and Abigail Williams and in March, 1692, she too, proclaimed to be afflicted. Her mother, Ann Carr Putman, a fearful woman who was still mourning the death of an infant daughter, also would later claim that she had been attacked by witches. Also living in the household was Mercy Lewis, who had been orphaned as a child and was distantly related to the Putnams. Working as a servant,Mercy Lewis, like Ann Putnam, Jr. would become one of the most vocal accusers during the trial. Many of the people that Ann Putnam accused were those that her family or the Reverend Parris had quarreled with. Some historians have speculated that her parents coerced her to accuse those they were feuding with or sought revenge on. As one of the most aggressive accusers, her name appeared over 400 times in court documents. She accused nineteen people and saw eleven of them hanged.


When her parents died in 1699, Putnam was left to raise her nine siblings aged 7 months to 16 years. Putnam never married. Fourteen years after the terrible trials, Ann Putman admitted that she had lied and apologized for the part she had played in the witch trials in 1706:


"I desire to be humbled before God for that sad and humbling providence that befell my father's family in the year about ninety-two; that I, then being in my childhood, should, by such a providence of God, be made an instrument for the accusing of several persons of a grievous crime, whereby their lives were taken away from them, whom, now I have just grounds and good reason to believe they were innocent persons; and that it was a great delusion of Satan that deceived me in that sad time, whereby I justly fear I have been instrumental, with others, though ignorantly and unwittingly, to bring upon myself and this land the guilt of innocent blood; though, what was said or done by me against any person, I can truly and uprightly say, before God and man, I did it not out of any anger, malice, or ill will to any person, for I had no such thing against one of them; but what I did was ignorantly, being deluded by Satan.

And particularly, as I was a chief instrument of accusing Goodwife Nurse and her two sisters, I desire to lie in the dust, and to be humble for it, in that I was a cause, with others, of so sad a calamity to them and their families; for which cause I desire to lie in the dust, and earnestly beg forgiveness of God, and from all those unto whom I have given just cause of sorrow and offense, whose relations were taken away or accused."

She died in 1716 at the age of 37. She is buried along with her parents in an unmarked grave at the Putnam Cemetery in Danvers, Massachusetts.









Ann Putnam, Jr. (1679-1716) - Ann Putnam, Jr., 12 ans, a joué un rôle crucial dans les procès de sorcellerie de 1692 comme l'une des trois premieres enfants "affligés". Née le 18 Octobre, 1679 à Salem Village, Massachusetts, elle était l'aînée des enfants de Thomas et Ann Putnam Carr. Elle était amie avec Elizabeth Parris et Abigail Williams et en Mars 1692, elle aussi, a proclamé être affligé. Sa mère, Ann Carr Putman, une femme redoutable qui était encore en deuil de la mort d'une petite fille, prétendra également plus tard qu'elle avait été attaqué par des sorcières. Vivant également dans le ménage, il y avait Mercy Lewis, une enfant orpheline, relation très éloignée des Putman. Travaillant comme domestique, Mercy Lewis, comme Ann Putnam Jr. allait devenir l’un des accusatrices les plus virulentes au cours des procès.
Beaucoup de gens qu’Ann Putnam a accusé étaient des personnes qui étaient brouillé avec sa famille ou avec le révérend Parris. Certains historiens ont émis l’hypothèse que ses parents l’avaient contrainte à accuser les personnes avec qui ils avaient eu des différents ou pour se venger d’eux.
Comme l'une des accusatrices les plus agressivess, son nom est plus de 400 fois apparu dans des documents judiciaires. Elle a accusé dix-neuf personnes et a vu onze d'entre eux pendu.



Quand ses parents sont morts en 1699, Ann PutnamJr. a élevé ses neuf frères et sœurs âgés de 7 mois à 16 ans. Ann Putnam Jr. ne s’est jamais mariée. Quatorze ans après les terribles épreuves, Ann Putman a admis qu'elle avait menti et a présenté ses excuses pour le rôle qu'elle avait joué dans les procès de sorcellerie en 1706:



« Je souhaite me mortifier devant Dieu pour la triste et humiliante providence qui a frappé la famille de mon père vers l'an 1692 ; que j'ai, étant enfant, pu, par une telle providence divine, devenir l'instrument d'accusations de plusieurs personnes pour des crimes graves, par lesquelles leurs vies ont été emportées et alors que j'ai maintenant de justes et bonnes raisons de penser qu'il s'agissait de personnes innocentes ; et que c'était une grande illusion de Satan qui m'abusa dans ce triste temps, illusion dont je crains à juste titre d'avoir été l'instrument, avec d'autres, quoique par ignorance et inconsciemment, pour répandre sur moi-même et sur cette terre la culpabilité d'un sang innocent ; bien que je puisse vraiment dire devant Dieu et les hommes que je ne fis pas par colère, méchanceté ou mauvaise intention envers quiconque, parce que je n'avais rien de tel contre aucun d'eux ; mais ce que je fis le fut par ignorance, étant abusée par Satan. Et en particulier, puisque je fus le principal instrument de l'accusation de maîtresse Nurse et de ses deux sœurs, je veux m'étendre dans la poussière et être mortifiée pour cela, de ce que j'ai été la cause, avec d'autres, d'une si triste calamité pour elles et leurs familles ; raison pour laquelle je veux m'allonger dans la poussière et sincèrement implorer le pardon de Dieu et de tous ceux à qui j'ai donné un juste motif de douleur et d'affront, dont les proches ont été emportés ou accusés. » (traduction libre - wikipedia)



Elle est morte en 1716 à l'âge de 37. Elle est enterrée avec ses parents dans une tombe anonyme au cimetière Putnam à Danvers, Massachusetts.




_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Jeu 19 Jan - 12:30

Ann Carr Putnam, Sr. (1661-1699) - The wife of Thomas Putnam, Jr. and the mother of Ann Putnam, Jr., Ann, Sr. would also be involved in the witch trial hysteria, allegedly having fits of her own and making accusations against suspected "witches." She was born on June 15, 1661 to George and Elizabeth Oliver Carr in Salisbury, Massachusetts. She would later move to Salem Village with her sister, Mary Carr Bailey. She married Thomas Putnam, Jr. on November 25, 1678 and the couple would eventually have 12 children. Described as a fearful woman with a highly sensitive temperament, she was seeming the opposite of her decisive and obstinate husband. Her mental health declined after her sister, Mary's three children died in quick succession, followed shortly by Mary herself in 1688.


Also having an effect on her was when her wealthy father, George Carr, who owned shipworks and milling businesses in Salisbury, died and she was disinherited. Instead the estate was given to her brothers. Though she tried to sue for her share of the inheritance, she was unsuccessful. In 1689, she lost an infant daughter further shaking her mental stability. After her daughter, Ann Putnam, Jr. began having fits and accusing people of witchcraft, Ann Carr Putnam soon joined her in both actions and accusations. Shortly afterwards, her brother-in-law, Joseph Putnam, specifically told her that if her lies about witchcraft touched anyone in his family, she would pay for it. Joseph would then keep guns loaded and horses saddled throughout the period of the trials to facilitate his family's escape if any of them were accused. None of them were. However, Ann, Sr. would accuse Martha Corey,Rebecca Towne Nurse, Bridget Playfer Bishop, and John Willard, who would all be executed for witchcraft. She would also testify against Sarah Towne Cloyce, William Hobbs, and Elizabeth Walker Cary. Her husband, Thomas Putnam, Jr., died on May 24, 1699 in Salem Village. Just two weeks later, on June 8th, Ann also passed away. Their daughter, Ann Putnam, Jr., was left to bring up their younger children.






Ann Carr Putnam, Sr. (1661-1699) – Ann Sr., l'épouse de Thomas Putnam, Jr. et la mère d'Ann Putnam, Jr., serait aussi impliqué dans l’hystérie des procès des sorcières, ayant prétendu avoir des crises et faisant des accusations contre les présumés «sorcières». Elle est la fille de George et Elizabeth Oliver Carr et est née le 15 Juin, 1661 à Salisbury, Massachusetts. Elle se déplacera plus tard à Salem Village avec sa soeur, Mary Carr Bailey. Elle a épousé Thomas Putnam, Jr. le 25 Novembre, 1678 et le couple finira par avoir 12 enfants. Décrite comme une femme craintive avec un tempérament très sensible, elle était à l'opposé de son mari décisif et obstiné. Sa santé mentale a décliné après les décès successifs de trois enfants de sa sœur Marie, suivi peu de temps après par le décès de Marie en 1688.


Ce qui a eu aussi de l’effet sur elle, était la mort de son riche père, George Carr, qui possédait Shipworks et les entreprises de menuiserie à Salisbury et qu’elle a été déshéritée. Au lieu de cela, la succession échut à ses frères. Même si elle a essayé de poursuivre en justice pour sa part de l'héritage, elle n’a pas réussi. En 1689, elle a perdu un nouveau-né, une fille secouant encore plus sa stabilité mentale. Après que sa fille, Ann Putnam, Jr. a commencé à avoir des crises et accuser les gens de sorcellerie, Ann Carr Putnam l’a bientôt rejoint dans ses actions et ses accusations. Peu de temps après, son beau-frère, Joseph Putnam, lui a dit précisément que si ses mensonges à propos de la sorcellerie, touchait quelqu'un dans sa famille, elle payerait pour cela. Joseph a alors gardé des fusils chargés et des chevaux sellés tout au long de la période des procès pour faciliter la fuite de sa famille si l'un d'entre eux venait à être accusé. Aucun d'entre eux ne le sera. Cependant, Ann, Sr. accusera Martha Corey, Rebecca Towne Nurse, Bridget Playfer Bishop et John Willard, qui seront tous exécutés pour sorcellerie. Elle a aussi témoigné contre Sarah Towne Cloyce, William Hobbs, et Elizabeth Walker Cary. Son mari, Thomas Putnam, Jr., est décédé le 24 mai, 1699 à Salem Village. Deux semaines plus tard, le 8 Juin, Ann est également décédée. Leur fille, Ann Putnam, Jr., a élevé leurs jeunes enfants.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Jeu 19 Jan - 12:32

Edward Putnam (1654-1747) - A third generation member of Salem Village, Edward Putnam was born to Thomas Putnam and Ann Holyoke on July 4, 1654 in Salem Village, Massachusetts. He grew up to marry Mary Hale on June 14, 1681 and the couple would have ten children. Edward had a farm in what is now Middleton, Massachusetts. On December 3, 1690, he became the second deacon for the Salem Village church. During the Salem Witch Trials, Edward, along with other members of his family brought charges and testified against many innocent people. He often participated in examinations of both the accused and the "afflicted" in order to determine whether or not they were truthful in their declarations. If he was convinced, he would then follow through with complaints and testimony. Of complaints filed, his name would be on those of Martha Corey, Sarah and Dorcas Good, Mary Ireson, Rebecca Nurse, Sarah Warren Prince Osborne. He would also testify against the Reverend George Burroughs, Mary Eastey, Elizabeth Bassett Proctor, John Willard, and Sarah Smith Buckley. Years later, Edward would become the historian and genealogist of the family, writing an account in 1733. He died on March 10, 1747 in Salem Village and was buried at the Burying Point Cemetery in Salem, Massachusetts.





Edward Putnam (1654-1747) - Un membre de la troisième génération de Salem Village, Edward Putnam est le fils de Thomas Putnam et Ann Holyoke et est né le 4 Juillet 1654 Salem Village, Massachusetts. Il épousa Mary Hale le 14 Juin 1681 et le couple aura dix enfants. Edward Avait une ferme dans ce qui est maintenant Middleton, Massachusetts. 3 Décembre 1690, il est devenu le deuxième diacre de l'Eglise Salem Village. Pendant les procès des sorcières Salem, Edward, ainsi d'autres Membres de sa famille ont porté plainte et témoigné contre de nombreuses personnes innocentes. Il participa souvent aux interrogatoires tant des accusés que des « affligées » pour déterminer si oui ou non ils disaient la vérité dans leur déclaration. S’il était convaincu, il poursuivait alors jusqu’au bout avec des plaintes et des témoignages.
Parmi les plaintes déposées, son nom apparait sur celles de Martha Corey, Sarah et Dorcas Good, Mary Ireson, Rebecca Nurse, Sarah Warren Osborne prince. Il témoignera aussi contre le révérend George Burroughs, Mary Eastey, Elizabeth Bassett Proctor, John Willard, et Sarah Smith Buckley. Des Années, plus tard, Edward deviendrait le généalogiste et historien de la famille, écrivant un compte en 1733. Il est décédé le 10 mar 1747 à Salem Village et a été enterré au Burying Point Cemetery à Salem, Massachusetts.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Jeu 19 Jan - 12:39

Hannah Cutler Putnam (1655-after 1722) The wife of John Putnam, the son of Nathaniel Putnam, Hannah was born to Samuel and Elizabeth Cutler on December 6, 1655 in Salem Village, Massachusetts. She grew up to marry John Putnam on December 2, 1678 and the couple would have 15 children. During the trial of Rebecca Nurse , Mary Easty , and Sarah Cloyce, she and her husband would give a deposition blaming the death of their eight week old child, who appeared to be having fits, on witchcraft. Hannah's husband would die in 1722 while she was still living. It is unknown when Hannah died.




Hannah Cutler Putnam (1655-après 1722) L'épouse de John Putnam, fils de Nathaniel Putnam, Hannah, fille de Samuel et Elizabeth Cutler, est né le 6 Décembre, 1655 à Salem Village, Massachusetts. Elle épousera John Putnam le 2 Décembre 1678 et le couple aura 15 enfants. Au cours du procès de Rebecca Nurse, Mary Easty et Sarah Cloyce, elle et son mari feront une déposition imputant la mort de leur nouveau-né de 8 semaines qui semblait avoir des crises, à la sorcellerie. Le mari de Hannah allait mourir en 1722, alors qu'elle vivait encore. On ne connait pas la date de décès d’Hannah.







John Putnam, Jr. (1657-1722)  was referred to as "John, Jr." in the witch trial documents to differentiate him from his uncle, by the same name. He was born to Nathaniel Putman and Elizabeth Hutchinson Putnam on March 26, 1657 in Salem Village. He would marry Hannah Cutler on December 2, 1678 and the couple would have 15 children. John and his large family lived on a farm in Salem Village that was located west of Hathorne's Hill near the Ipswich river. His cousins, Thomas and Edward Putnam lived nearby. For unknown reasons he had the nickname of "Carolina John." John was appointed to several minor political positions and also worked as a road surveyor. During the witchcraft excitement, he was serving as a constable in Salem Village.

He and his first cousin, Edward Putnam, signed the complaint that put Rebecca Towne Nurse behind bars, as well as the complaint against four year-old Dorcas Good. Along with other members of his family he would also swear out complaints and testify against numerous other people including Martha Allen Carrier, Giles Corey, Bridget Bishop, Mary Easty, Sarah Cloyce, and many others. During the trial of Rebecca Nurse, Mary Easty , and Sarah Cloyce, he would give a deposition blaming the death of their eight week old child, who appeared to be having fits, on witchcraft. In the same deposition he would also say that he, too, had been afflicted and was taken by a strange type of fit. Later, when the whole witch affair was over, several of the wronged members of the church met at his home in 1698, where the majority agreed to live and "love together." This was just one week after the ordination of the Reverend Joseph Green. Putnam died in September, 1722 in Salem Village.







John Putnam, Jr. (1657-1722) a été mentionné comme "John, Jr." dans les documents de procès de sorcières pour le différencier de son oncle, qui avait  le même nom. Fils de Nathaniel et Elizabeth Hutchinson Putman, il  est né le 26 Mars 1657 à Salem Village. Il épousera Hannah Cutler le 2 Décembre 1678 et le couple aurait 15 enfants. John et sa grande famille vivaient dans une ferme dans le village de Salem qui était situé à l'ouest de la colline de Hathorne près de la rivière Ipswich. Ses cousins, Thomas et Edward Putnam vivaient à proximité. Pour des raisons inconnues, il avait le surnom de "Carolina John." John a été nommé à plusieurs postes politiques mineures et a également travaillé comme géomètre. Au cours de l'excitation de la sorcellerie, il servait comme agent de police à Salem Village.


Lui et son cousin, Edward Putnam, ont signé la plainte qui a mis Rebecca Towne Nurse derrière les barreaux, ainsi que la plainte contre Dorcas Good, âgé de 4 ans. Avec d'autres membres de sa famille il portera aussi  des plaintes et témoignera contre de nombreuses autres personnes, y compris Martha Allen Carrier, Giles Corey, Bridget Bishop, Mary Easty, Sarah Cloyce, et bien d'autres. Au cours du procès de Rebecca Nurse, Mary Easty et Sarah Cloyce, il fera une déposition imputant la mort de leur bébé de 8 semaines qui semblait avoir des crises, à la sorcellerie. Dans la même déposition,  il dit aussi qu’il avait été affligé et a été pris par un type étrange de crise. Plus tard, lorsque toute l'affaire de sorcellerie pris fin, plusieurs des membres lésés de l'église se sont réunis à son domicile en 1698, où la majorité a accepté de vivre et «d’aimer ensemble." Ce fut juste une semaine après l'ordination du révérend Joseph Green. Putnam est mort en Septembre 1722 à Salem Village.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Jeu 19 Jan - 12:40

John Putnam, Sr. (1627-1710) - Referred to as "John, Sr." in the witch trial documents to differentiate his testimonies from those of his nephew's, this John Putnam was the son of the original patriarch, John Putnam and his wife, Elizabeth Gould Putnam. He had a son named John, but he had already died by the time of the witch trials. He also had a son named Johnathan, who does appear in the trial documents. John Putnam was christened on May 27, 1627 in Aston Abbotts, Bucks, England and immigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colonywith his parents in about 1634. He married Rebecca Prince on September 3, 1652. The two settled in Salem Village and would have ten children. Before 1673, he and his brother Nathaniel invested in an ironworks on lands they owned in nearby Rowley. When the financially-troubled enterprise burned in 1674, they sued the managers for negligence.



The Putnams were active in the village church and in 1683, when the Reverend George Burroughs' salary was halted for his services, he simply stopped meeting his congregation and left for Maine. The Salem Villagecommittee, which included John Putnam, Sr., threatened to sue him for leaving his post. Being a man of honor, Burroughs returned to Salem Village to settle accounts, which included money owned to him as well as debts he owed to others of the community. Upon his return, he was threatened for arrest on a complaint made by John Putnam. Though it was found that Burroughs did not owe Putnam any money, he spent one night in jail. The next day, the moneys owed to Burroughs were paid and he in turn, paid his debts. Obviously there was some bad blood between the pair, that would later rise again almost a decade later.

When the witch accusations began in 1692, one of the first to be accused was Sarah Warren Prince Osborne, with whom the Putnams were in a legal battle with. Sarah, who had previously been married to Robert Prince, thought to have been John's wife's brother, had remarried after her first husband died and was allegedly attempting to take over her sons inheritance. The powerful Putnams had stepped in to save their nephews, James and Joseph Prince, from being cheated. Osborne would die in prison just a few months later. He and his wife, Rebecca, would also testify against the Reverend George Burroughs, who would be hanged on August 19, 1692. He would also give depositions against Rebecca Towne Nurse, Martha Allen Carrier, and John Williard, all of whom would be executed. The only person that he gave testimony against, that didn't see the end of a noose, was Sarah Smith Buckley. John Putnam died on April 7, 1710.







John Putnam, Sr. (1627-1710) - Dénommé "John, Sr." dans les documents de procès de sorcières pour différencier ses témoignages de ceux de son neveu, ce John Putnam était le fils du patriarche (original), John Putnam et son épouse, Elizabeth Gould Putnam. Il avait un fils nommé John, mais il était déjà mort au moment des procès de sorcellerie. En outre, il avait un fils nommé Jonathan, qui apparaît dans les documents du procès. John Putnam a été baptisé le 27 mai 1627 à Aston Abbotts, Bucks, Angleterre et a immigré à la colonnie Massachusetts Bay avec ses parents aux environs de 1634. Il a épousé Rebecca Prince le 3 Septembre 1652. Ils se sont installés dans le village de Salem et auront dix enfants. Avant 1673, lui et son frère Nathaniel investissent dans une usine sidérurgique sur les terres qu'ils possédaient dans les environs de Rowley. Lorsque l'entreprise qui avait des problèmes financiers a brulée en 1674, ils ont poursuivi les responsables pour négligence.


Les Putnams étaient actifs dans l'église du village et en 1683, quand le salaire du Révérend George Burrough a cessé d’être payé pour ses services, celui-ci a simplement arrêté de rencontrer la congrégation et est parti pour le Maine. Le comité de Salem Village, qui comprenait John Putnam, Sr., a menacé de le poursuivre pour avoir abandonné son poste. Etant un homme d'honneur, Burroughs est revenu à Salem Village pour régler des comptes, ce qui comprenait l'argent lui appartenant, ainsi que les dettes qu'il devait à d'autres personnes de la communauté. À son retour, il a été menacé d'arrestation sur une plainte déposée par John Putnam. Bien qu'il ait été prouvé que Burroughs ne devait pas d'argent Putnam, il a passé une nuit en prison. Le lendemain,
L’argent qu’on lui devait a été payé et lui a pu payer ses dettes.
De toute évidence, il y avait une mauvais relation entre ces deux-là, qui allait à nouveau se déclencher près d'une décennie plus tard.


Lorsque les accusations de sorcellerie ont commencé en 1692, l'une des premières à être accusé sera Sarah Warren prince Osborne qui était dans une bataille juridique avec les Putnam. Sarah, qui avait déjà été marié à Robert Prince qui semble avoir été le frère de la femme de John, s’est remarié après le décès de son premier mari et aurait essayé de s’accaparer de l’héritage de ses fils. Le puissant Putnams était intervenu pour sauver ses neveux, James et Joseph Prince. Osborne allait mourir en prison quelques mois plus tard. Lui et sa femme, Rebecca, également témoigneront contre le révérend George Burroughs, qui sera pendu le 19 Août, 1692. En outre, il donnera des dépositions contre Rebecca Towne Nurse, Martha Allen Carrier et John Williard, qui tous seront exécutés. La seule personne contre qui il a témoigné et qui ne finira pas au bout d’une corde était Sarah Smith Buckley. John Putnam est mort le 7 Avril, 1710.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Jeu 19 Jan - 12:44

Jonathan Putnam (1658-1739) - Born to to John Putnam and Rebecca Prince Putnam on March 17, 1658 in Salem Village, Jonathan would grow up to marry Elizabeth Whipple in about 1681. Elizabeth died either while she was giving birth to her only child or, shortly thereafter in August, 1682. Her son died a few months later. Jonathan then married Lydia Potter in 1683 and the couple would eventually have nine children. Jonathan Putnam built a house, not far from his father's on the Topsfield road. He was a successful farmer and active in the community, chosen to the grand jury in 1683, and as a highway surveyor the following year. He also served as a selectman for a number of years. Serving in the Salem Militia, he rose to the rank of Captain. Like his father and other members of his family, they saw it their duty to protect their nephews from Sarah Warren Prince Osborne, who they claimed was cheating their nephews out their inheritance. When the witch hysteria broke out in 1692, Sarah Osborne was one of the first to be accused. Jonathan would testify against her, as well as Mary Easty, Rebecca Nurse, Dorcas Good, John Williard and Sarah Buckley.






Jonathan Putnam (1658-1739) – fils de John Putnam Putnam et Rebecca prince - est né le 17 Mars, 1658 à Salem Village, Jonathan épousera Elizabeth Whipple aux environs de 1681. Elizabeth est morte soit alors qu'elle donnait naissance à son unique enfant ou peu de temps après en Août 1682. Son fils est mort quelques mois plus tard. Jonathan a ensuite épousé Lydia Potter en 1683 et le couple finira par avoir neuf enfants. Jonathan Putnam a construit une maison, non loin de son Père sur la route de Topsfield. Il était un fermier prospère et actif dans la communauté, choisi par le grand jury en 1683, et comme géomètre l'année suivante. Aussi, il a servi comme conseillé municipal pendant un certain nombre d'années. Servant dans la milice de Salem, il atteint le grade de capitaine. Comme son père et d'autres membres de sa famille, il fait son devoir en protégeant ses neveux de Sarah Warren prince Osborne, qui voulait leur voler leur héritage. Lorsque l'hystérie de sorcière a éclaté en 1692, Sarah Osborne a été l'une des premières à être accusé. Jonathan allait témoigner contre elle, ainsi que contre Mary Easty, Rebecca Nurse, Dorcas Bon, John Willard et Sarah Buckley.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Jeu 19 Jan - 12:45


Nathaniel Putnam (1619-1700) - The son of the original patriarch, John Putnam and his wife, Elizabeth Gould Putnam, Nathaniel was baptized on October 11, 1619, at Aston Abbotts, Bucks, England. He immigrated with his parents to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in about 1634. He married Elizabeth Hutchinson in 1650 and the two would have seven children. For years, Nathaniel joined his neighbors in trying to make Salem Villageindependent from Salem Towne. In addition to wanting the village to have its own church, he also protested that Salem Towne was too far away for its men to be expected to share in mandatory guard duty there. Because he was so outspoken, in 1669 a Salem court ordered him to apologize publicly or pay a fine of £20. When Salem Village built its own church in 1672 he served on the building committee.


Before 1673, he and his brother John invested in an ironworks on lands they owned in nearby Rowley. When the financially-troubled enterprise burned in 1674, they sued the managers for negligence. In 1681, Nathaniel was second in wealth only to his brother Thomas, and lived on a 75 acre spread he had acquired from his father-in-law Richard Hutchinson. In 1886, after his brother, Thomas, died, he became head of the prominent Putnam family. During the witchcraft hysteria of 1692, he signed complaints against Elizabeth Fosdick and Elizabeth Paine, and would also serve as a witness againstJohn Willard and Sarah Buckley. Nathaniel died on July 23, 1700 in Salem Village.








Nathaniel Putnam (1619-1700) - Le fils du patriarche original, John Putnam et son épouse, Elizabeth Gould Putnam, Nathaniel a été baptisé le 11 Octobre, 1619, à Aston Abbotts, Bucks, Angleterre. Il a immigré avec ses parents à la colonie de Massachusetts Bay aux environs de 1634. Il a épousé Elizabeth Hutchinson en 1650 et ils auront sept enfants. Pendant des années, Nathaniel a rejoint ses voisins en essayant de rendre Village Salem indépendant de Salem Towne. En plus de vouloir que le village ait sa propre église, il a protesté également que Salem Towne était trop loin pour que ses hommes partage en service de garde obligatoire là-bas. Parce qu'il était si franc, en 1669 la cour Salem lui a ordonné de présenter des excuses publiques ou de payer une amende de £ 20. Lorsque Salem Village a construit sa propre église en 1672, il a siégé au comité de construction.



Avant 1673, lui et son frère John avaient investi dans une usine sidérurgique sur les terres qu'ils possédaient dans les environs de Rowley. Lorsque l'entreprise qui avait des difficultés financières a brûlé en 1674, ils ont poursuivi les responsables pour négligence. En 1681, Nathaniel, était le deuxième membre le plus riche de la famille derrière son frère Thomas, et a vécu sur un terrain de 75 acres qu'il avait acquis de son beau-frère Richard Hutchinson. En 1886, après le décès de son frère Thomas, il est devenu le chef de la famille Putnam. Au cours de l'hystérie de sorcellerie de 1692, il a signé des plaintes contre Elizabeth Fosdick et Elizabeth Paine, et servira de témoin également contre John Willard et Sarah Buckley. Nathaniel est mort le 23 Juillet, 1700 à Salem Village.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Jeu 19 Jan - 12:47

Thomas Putnam, Jr. (1651-1699) - A third generation member of Salem Village, Thomas was a significant accuser in the notorious 1692 Salem witch trials. He was born to immigrant Thomas Putnam and Ann Holyoke on January 12, 1651 (or '52) in Salem Village, Massachusetts. When he grew up, he served in the local militia and fought in King Phillip's War (1675-1678), obtaining the rank of sergeant. Upon returning home, he married Ann Carr, who came from a wealthy family, on November 25, 1678. The couple would eventually have 12 children. Beginning in the 1660's, Salem Village began the process of trying to separate itself from the larger nearby community of Salem Towne. The Putnam family supported this effort whole heartedly. The village finally was allowed to build its own church and hire a minister in 1672. However, not all of Salem Village's residents supported this idea, which would eventually split the settlement into two factions. Heading up the group who supported the independence of Salem Village was Thomas Putnam, Jr. Opposing him and his followers were the powerful Porter family. Both families were early settlers of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, both families had been successful, and both were large land owners in Salem Village. Over time, the division of the community became more and more heated.


Thomas Putnam, Jr. appears to have been an embittered man for a variety of reasons. The Putnams were farmers who followed the simple and austere lifestyle of traditional Puritans. They, along with other farmers in Salem Village, believed that the thriving economy of Salem Towne, and more specifically, thriving merchants, made people too individualistic, which was in opposition to the communal nature that Puritanism mandated. On the other hand, though the Porters derived much of their wealth from agricultural operations, they were also entrepreneurs who developed commercial interests in Salem Towne as well as other areas, and were active in the governmental affairs of the larger community. Due to these differing viewpoints, the Porters' diversified business interests allowed them to increase their family's wealth, becoming one of the wealthiest families in the area. In the meantime, the Putnam family wealth was stagnated.



Further adding to Putnam's issues of "wealth" was the death of his father in 1686. Thomas, Jr.'s father and his wife Ann Holyoke had born ten children. But, when his mother died in childbirth in 1665, Thomas Sr. married for a second time to a woman named Mary Veren on November 14, 1666. This union would produce one child -- Joseph, who was born on September 14, 1669. Thomas, Jr. did not get along well with his younger half-brother Joseph and when his father died in 1686, he felt cheated out of his inheritance when Thomas Sr. left almost all of his estate to his second wife Mary, and their son Joseph. Thomas, Jr. and his brother, would contest the will, but their efforts were unsuccessful. Adding insult to injury, his half-brother Joseph married Elizabeth Porter, the daughter of his enemy Israel Porter, on April 21, 1690.



His wife, Ann Carr Putnam, had also been disinherited. When her wealthy father died, she got nothing, as his estate was given to her brothers. She also tried unsuccessfully to sue for her inheritance. She too was embittered and also said to have been a woman of a highly sensitive temperament. Before she had married Thomas Putnam, she had moved to Salem with her sister, Mary. When her sister's three children died in quick succession, followed shortly by Mary herself in 1688, Ann's mental stability was severely shaken and she went into a decline.


It was not long after the first of the "afflicted girls", Elizabeth Parris began to have fits, that Thomas' own daughter, Ann Putnam, Jr., would also begin to show symptoms of having been afflicted by witch craft. She was followed by Putman's niece, Mary Walcott, and a servant girl who lived in the Putnam household named Mercy Lewis. Twelve year-old Ann Putnam, Jr. would become the most prolific accuser in the witchcraft trials, her name appearing over 400 times in the court documents. By the time the hysteria was over, she had accused nineteen people, and had seen eleven of them hanged.



Thomas Putnam, Jr. gave his daughter’s accusations legal weight in first seeking warrants against the accused witches in February, 1692. He would also participate by writing down the depositions of many of the "afflicted" girls, personally swear out a number of complaints, and write letters of encouragement to the judges. It is obvious that Thomas Putman, Jr. had a great influence on the shape and progression of the trials. Though he has never been accused of deliberately setting up the hysteria, he, his family, and his friends benefited to some extent by eliminating their enemies.



Thomas Putnam, Jr. died on May 24, 1699 in Salem Village. Just two weeks later, on June 8th, his wife, Ann Carr Putnam, also passed away. Their daughter, Ann Putnam, Jr., was left to bring up their younger children







Thomas Putnam, Jr. (1651-1699) - Un membre de la troisième génération de Salem Village, Thomas était un accusateur important dans les fameux procès des sorcières de Salem en 1692. Fils des immigrants Thomas et Ann Putnam Holyoke, il est né le 12 Janvier, 1651 (ou '52) à Salem Village, Massachusetts. Quand il a grandi, il a servi dans la milice locale et a combattu dans la guerre du roi Philippe (1675-1678), obtenant le grade de sergent. En rentrant chez lui, il épousa Ann Carr, qui venait d'une famille riche, le 25 Novembre 1678. Le couple finira par avoir 12 enfants. Au début des années 1660, le village de Salem a commencé le processus pour se libérer de la collectivité de la ville voisine Salem Towne. La famille Putnam a soutenu cet effort de tout cœur. Le village a finalement été autorisé à construire sa propre église et d'embaucher un ministre en 1672. Cependant, pas tous les habitants de Salem Village, ont soutenu cette idée, qui finira par diviser la communauté en deux factions. A la tête du groupe qui a soutenu l'indépendance de Salem Village, il y avait Thomas Putnam, Jr. lui et ses disciples étaient opposé à la puissante famille Porter. Les deux familles étaient les premiers colons de la colonie de Massachusetts Bay, les deux familles avaient réussi, et les deux étaient de grands propriétaires fonciers à Salem Village. Au fil du temps, la division de la communauté est devenue plus chaude.


Thomas Putnam, Jr. semble avoir été un homme aigri pour une foule de raisons. Les Putnam étaient des agriculteurs qui ont suivi le mode de vie simple et austère des puritains traditionnels. Il a, avec d'autres agriculteurs dans le village de Salem, estimé que l'économie prospère de Salem Towne, et plus précisément, l’essor grandissant des marchands, a rendu les gens trop individualistes, ce qui était en opposition à la nature communautaire de ce Puritanisme d’époque. D'autre part, bien que les Porters aient tiré leur richesse d’opérations agricoles, ils étaient aussi des entrepreneurs qui ont développé des intérêts commerciaux à Salem Towne, ainsi que dans d'autres domaines, et ont été actifs dans les affaires gouvernementales de la communauté de Salem Towne. En raison de ces deux points de vue différents, les intérêts commerciaux diversifiés des Porters leur ont permis d'augmenter la richesse de leur famille, devenant l'une des familles les plus riches de la région. En attendant, la richesse de la famille Putnam a stagné.


S’ajoute aux questions de « richesse » de Putnam de «richesse», il y a la mort de son père en 1686. Le père de Thomas Jr. et sa femme Ann Holyoke ont eu dix enfants. Mais, quand sa mère est morte en couches en 1665, Thomas Sr. a épousé en seconde noce, une femme nommée Mary Veren le 14 Novembre 1666. De cette union naitra un enfant - Joseph, qui est né le 14 Septembre, 1669. Thomas, Jr. ne s’est pas entendu avec son jeune demi-frère Joseph et quand son père est mort en 1686, il s’est senti trahi lorsque Thomas Sr., a laissé tout l’héritage à sa seconde épouse et a son fils Joseph. Thomas Jr. et son frère ont contesté le testament mais leurs efforts a ont été infructueux. Ajoutant l'insulte à l'injure, son demi-frère Joseph épousa Elizabeth Porter, la fille de son ennemi Israël Porter, le 21 Avril, 1690.


Sa femme, Ann Carr Putnam, avait également été déshéritée. Quand son père qui était riche, est mort, elle n'a rien, l’héritage a été donné à ses frères. Elle a aussi tenté en vain d’intenter une action en justice pour son héritage. Elle aussi était aigrie et on a dit aussi qu’elle était une femme au tempérament très sensible. Avant elle d’épouser Thomas Putnam, elle a déménagé à Salem avec sa soeur, Mary. Lorsque trois enfants de sa sœur sont morts succesivement, suivi peu de temps après par Marie elle-même en 1688, la stabilité mentale de Ann a été gravement ébranlée et sa santé a décliné.


Peu de temp après que la première des "filles affligées", Elizabeth Parris commenca à avoir des crises, la propre fille de Thomas, Ann Putnam, Jr., commencera également à montrer des symptômes de possession. Elle a été suivie par la nièce de Putman, Mary Walcott, et une servante qui a vécu dans la maison des Putnam nommée Mercy Lewis. Ann Putnam, Jr., 12 ans, deviendra l'accusatrice la plus prolifique dans les procès de sorcellerie, son nom apparaissant plus de 400 fois dans les documents judiciaires. Au moment où l'hystérie était terminée, elle avait accusé dix-neuf personnes, et en avait vu onze d'entre eux pendus.

Thomas Putnam, Jr. a donné un poids légal aux accusations de sa fille en demandant dans un premier temps des mandats d'arrêt contre les personnes accusées de sorcellerie en février 1692. Il participera également en notant les dépositions de plusieurs des filles "affligés", jura personnellement un certain nombre de plaintes, et écrira des lettres d'encouragement aux juges. Il est évident que Thomas Putman, Jr. a eu une grande influence sur la forme et la progression des procès. Bien qu'il n’ait jamais été accusé d'avoir délibérément été l’instigateur de la mise en place de l'hystérie, lui, sa famille et ses amis ont bénéficié dans une certaine mesure de l'élimination de leurs ennemis.


Thomas Putnam, Jr. est mort le 24 mai, 1699 à Salem Village . Deux semaines plus tard, le 8 Juin, son épouse, Ann Carr Putnam , également décédé. Leur fille, Ann Putnam, Jr. , élevera leurs jeunes enfants


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Jeu 19 Jan - 12:48

Captain Jonathan Walcott (1639–1699) - Born to William and Alice Ingersoll Walcott in 1639, William grew up to wed Mary Sibley about 1664 and the couple would have six children, one of whom was Mary Walcott, who would later become one of the "afflicted girls" in the witchcraft hysteria of 1692. During the years of 1675-76, he served in King Phillip's War. Mary Sibley died on December 28, 1683 and Captain Walcott would marry a second time to Deliverance Putnam on April 23, 1685. Deliverance was the sister of Thomas Putnam, Jr. The couple would have seven children. A wheelwright by trade, Walcott also owned land next to his Uncle Nathaniel Ingersoll. In 1690, Jonathan Walcott was elected captain of the military company at Salem Village. His Uncle Nathaniel Ingersoll would also serve in the Salem militia, first as a corporal, then a sergeant, and finally as a lieutenant. When the witch hysteria broke out in 1692, he became involved and was known to have signed many of the complaints against the accused. He died on December 16, 1699.





Capitaine Jonathan Walcott (1639-1699) –fils de William et Alice Ingersoll Walcott est né en 1639, William épousera Mary Sibley en 1664 et le couple aura six enfants, dont l'un était - Mary Walcott, qui deviendra plus tard l'une des "filles affligées" dans l'hystérie de sorcellerie de 1692. Pendant les années 1675-1676, il a servi dans la guerre du roi Phillip. Mary Sibley est décédé le 28 Décembre 1683, le capitaine Walcott épousera en seconde noce Deliverance Putnam le 23 Avril, 1685. Deliverance était la sœur de Thomas Putnam, Jr. Le couple aura sept enfants. Charron de métier, Walcott possédait aussi des terres à côté de son oncle Nathaniel Ingersoll. En 1690, Jonathan Walcott a été élu capitaine de la compagnie militaire à Salem Village. Son oncle Nathaniel Ingersoll servira également au besoin dans la milice de Salem, d'abord comme caporal, puis sergent, et enfin en tant que lieutenant. Lorsque l'hystérie de sorcière a éclaté en 1692, il a été impliqué et a été connu pour avoir signé de nomreuses plaintes contre les accusés. Il est mort le 16 Décembre, 1699.

_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Jeu 19 Jan - 12:49

Mary Walcott (1675-1752) - The cousin of Ann Putnam Jr., Mary Walcott was a regular witness in the witch trials of Salem, Massachusetts. Mary was born to Jonathan Walcott, Captain of the Salem Village Militia, and Mary Sibley Walcott on July 5, 1675. When Mary was young, her mother died and her father married Deliverance Putnam, thus making him the brother-in-law of Thomas Putnam, Jr., who was not only one of the most powerful men in the village, but, also one of the major accusers.

Her aunt was Mary Sibley Woodrow, who decided to try some white magic to fend off the evil powers in the village. She had shown Tituba and her husband, John Indian, slaves of the Reverend Samuel Parris, how to make the "witch cake" to discover witches that resulted in Elizabeth Parris and Abigail Williams making their first accusations. For this advice, Mary Sibley Woodrow was suspended from the church; but, was later reinstated after she made a confession that her purpose was innocent. In the meantime, her 17 year-old niece, Mary Walcott, had gotten caught up in the whole witch hunt affair.

At the trials, while Mary Walcott was not the most notorious of the accusers, her role in the Salem witch trials was by no means minimal. She was said to have been calm in the beginning, but later, critics accused her of being a witch herself, who foiled her potential adversaries by distracting their attention away from herself onto innocent persons. However, Mary was never indicted for this accusation.

When the trials were over she married Isaac Farrar on April 29, 1696 and they eventually moved to Townsend, Massachusetts. They had eight children. She died in 1752 at the age of 77.







Mary Walcott (1675-1752) - La cousine d’Ann Putnam Jr., Mary Walcott était un témoin régulier dans les procès des sorcières de Salem, Massachusetts. Marie, fille de Jonathan Walcott, capitaine du village de Salem Milice, et Mary Sibley Walcott est née le 5 Juillet 1675. Quand Marie était jeune, sa mère est morte et son père a épousé Deliverance Putnam, devenant ainsi le beau-frère de Thomas Putnam, Jr., qui était non seulement l'un des hommes les plus puissants dans le village, mais également l'un des principaux accusateurs.


Sa tante était Mary Sibley Woodrow, qui s’essaya à un peu de magie blanche pour repousser les puissances du mal dans le village. Elle avait montré à Tituba et à son mari, John Indien, esclaves du révérend Samuel Parris, comment faire le «gâteau aux sorcières" pour découvrir les sorcières qui ont amenés Elizabeth Parris et Abigail Williams à faire leurs premières accusations. Pour cette affaire, Mary Sibley Woodrow a été suspendu de l'église; mais elle a ensuite été rétablie après avoir fait une confession que son but était innocent. Sa nièce, Mary Walcott, 17 ans, avait réussi à rattraper son retard dans la chasse aux sorcières.


Lors des procès, alors que Mary Walcott n'a pas été le plus notoire des accusateurs, son rôle dans les procès des sorcières de Salem n’était pas minime. On a dit qu’elle était calme au début, mais plus tard, les critiques l’ont accusé d'être une sorcière elle-même, elle a éloigné le regard de ses adversaires potentiels en détournant leur attention sur des personnes innocentes. Cependant, Marie n'a jamais été inculpée pour cette accusation.

Lorsque les procès ont été terminés, elle a épousé Isaac Farrar sur Avril 29, 1696 et ils ont finalement déménagé à Townsend, Massachusetts. Ils ont eu huit enfants. Elle est morte en 1752 à l'âge de 77 ans.


_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Lanaelle
Admin
avatar

Messages : 2396
Date d'inscription : 29/12/2015

MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   Jeu 19 Jan - 13:21





Reverend Samuel Parris (1653-1720) - Samuel Parris was the Puritan minister inSalem Village, Massachusetts during the Salem witch trials, as well as the father of one of the afflicted girls, Elizabeth Parris, and the uncle of another -- Abigail Williams.





Samuel was born in London, England in 1653, the son of cloth merchant Thomas Parris, who also had interests in the island colony of Barbados. When Samuel grew up, he was sent to Massachusetts to study at Harvard. In 1673, while he was still in college, his father died, leaving the 20 year-old with a plantation in Barbados. After graduating, Parris moved to the island where he leased out the family sugar plantation and settled in Bridgetown. There, he established himself as a credit agent for other sugar planters



In 1680, after a hurricane hit Barbados, much of his property was damaged. He then left the island, taking two slaves, Tituba and John Indian, with him. He then settled in Boston where he once again tried to establish himself as a merchant. He purchased a wharf and warehouse and attended Boston's First Church, where he met Elizabeth Eldridge. The two would soon marry and would have three children, Thomas, Elizabeth, and Susannah. His slaves, Tituba and John Indian remained a part of his household. Dissatisfied with the life of a merchant, Parris considered a change in vocation and in 1686, he began substituting for absent ministers and speaking at informal church gatherings.


After the birth of their third child, the Reverend Parris began formal negations with Salem Village to become the village's new minister. At this time, Salem Village was known to be a contentious place, described by residents of neighboring towns as quarrelsome. It had also already been through three ministers, who had all departed after having issues with the congregation. Though Parris was aware of the village conflicts that had taken place in the last several years, his Puritan beliefs that each person was responsible for monitoring his neighbor's piety led him to feel that conflict was inevitable.


On June 18, 1689 at a general meeting of all of the villagers, it was agreed to hire Samuel Parris, at an annual salary of £66 and the villagers would provide firewood for both the church and parsonage. At a later meeting, the villagers agreed they would also provide Parris and his heirs, the village parsonage, a barn, and two acres of land. Parris agreed and he and his family immediately moved to Salem Village, settling into the parsonage, and beginning his ministerial duties that same month. To the parsonage, Reverend Parris brought his wife, Elizabeth, his nine-year-old daughter Elizabeth, his 11 year-old niece, Abigail Williams, and his slaves, Tituba and John Indian.


On November 19, 1689, the Salem Village church charter was finally signed and the Reverend Samuel Parris became Salem Village's first ordained minister. His ministry began smoothly; but, as Parris began to reveal his beliefs and traits, a number of Salem Villagers, including a few church members, did not like what they saw. A serious, dedicated minister, he combined his evangelical enthusiasm to revitalize religion in Salem Village with psychological rigidity and theological conservatism.


While the Salem Towne Church and most Puritan churches of the time, were relaxing their standards for church membership, Parris held rigid to traditional strict standards, which required that members be baptized and make a public declaration of experiencing God's free grace to become full members. Most village church members were happy with Parris's traditionalism, which elevated their status by sharply distinguishing them from non-church members. But, a minority dissented and found allies among non-members, who constituted a large and influential part of the Salem Village community.


Suddenly, Parris also found himself in the midst of contract disputes with the members of the Salem VillageChurch council. The council alleged that the contract, which was seemingly never formalized, only provided Parris with the parsonage and lands only so long as he remained minister, rather than Parris' beliefs that the contract granted Parris outright ownership of the house and lands. At the same time, Parris was making plans to refurbish the meeting house, commensurate with its new status as a full church. But, to many, this signaled a church both more intrusive and more expensive than some villagers wished.

By the fall of 1691, only two years after his ordination, Parris's ritual orthodoxy, overbearing disposition, and disputed contract had caused the village and church to once again break into factions. Church attendance fell and village officials refused to provide firewood to warm the church or Parris's house. Matters turned worse when a new Committee of Five was chosen by the village in October, 1691, which announced its refusal to relinquish the ministry house and land to Parris or to collect taxes for his salary, leaving it to the villagers to pay by "voluntary contributions." Parris then called upon church members to make a formal complaint to the County Court against the committee's neglect of the church. The factional fighting also began to play out in his weekly sermons as a battle between God and Satan.


That very winter, Samuel's daughter, Elizabeth Parris and her cousin, Abigail Williams, began to undertake experiments in fortune telling, mostly focusing on their future social status and potential husbands. They were quick to share their game with other young girls in the area, even though the practice of fortune telling was regarded as a demonic activity. By January, 1692, nine year-old Elizabeth appeared to be consumed with a secret preoccupation and was forgetting errands and unable to concentrate. She then began to act in strange ways, barking like a dog when her father would rebuke her, screaming wildly when she heard the "Our Father" prayer and once, hurled a Bible across the room. After these episodes, she sobbed distractedly and spoke of being damned, perhaps because of her practice of "fortune telling."

The Reverend Samuel Parris believed that prayer could cure her odd behavior, but, his efforts were ineffective. In fact, her actions got worse. Soon, she was contorting her body into odd postures, consistently spouting foolish and ridiculous speeches, and generally having fits. The Reverend Parris consulted other ministers, who would not explain her actions. But, when he brought in the local doctor, William Griggs, he suggested that her malady must be the result of witchcraft. Parris then organized prayer meetings and days of fasting in an attempt to alleviate Elizabeth's symptoms. But, the frenzy just spread. Soon, Elizabeth's cousin, Abigail Williams, was also having fits, followed by some of their friends, including Ann Putnam, Jr. and Mary Walcott. Since the sufferers of witchcraft were believed to be the victims of a crime, the community set out to find the perpetrators. On February 29, 1692, under intense adult questioning, the Elizabeth Parris and Abigail Williams named Sarah Good, Sarah Osborne, and Tituba as their tormentors.



Parris' preaching had a major hand in creating the divisions within the village that contributed to the accusations of 1692. During the crisis, he declared the church under siege by the Devil, who was assisted by "wicked & reprobate men." Parris began to draw "battle lines" between those who supported him and those who didn't, who were, no doubt, the very ones he had called "wicked & reprobate." The accusations against the opposing factions ofSalem Village began in earnest and soon spread to other nearby towns including Andover, Beverly, Topsfield, Wenham, and others.


When the trials began, the Reverend Samuel Parris would submit complaints, serve as a witness, testify against many of those who were accused, and sometimes, would serve as the record keeper of the events. By the end of May, 1692, more than 150 “witches” had been jailed and by September, 19 people had refused to confess and were hanged, and another had been pressed to death for refusing to make a plea. By October, however, cooler heads began to prevail and the court disallowed “spectral evidence.” The affair wouldn't end until May, 1693, when all of the accused were finally released from jail.



Though the hysteria had finally ended, Salem Village was still divided and many were even more dissatisfied with the Reverend Parris. However, in 1695, two years after the end of the trials, Parris still garnered a majority of town support. But, over time, the families of those who had been accused, and especially of those who had been executed, would push him out. Rebecca Nurse's family and others directly accused Parris of providing names to the court, and many people had strong misgivings about his place in the trials. Some villagers brought charges against him for his part in the trials, leading him to apologize for his error. Samuel's wife died in 1696 at the age of 48 and is buried in the Danvers Cemetery.



Despite the intense dislike of many Salem villagers, Parris stayed on until 1697, when hw accepted another preaching position in Stow, Massachusetts. He would later live in Watertown and Concord, where he worked as a trader and a licensed retailer. Somewhere along the line he would marry for a second time to Dorothy Noyes and the couple would have four children. He began preaching in Dunstable in 1708, which he continued until 1712. From there, he moved to Sudbury, where he worked as a farmer and at times, as a school teacher. He died in Sudbury on February 27, 1720.

Parris was replaced by the Reverend Joseph Green in 1697, a man who genuinely wanted to heal Salem and started the village on the long and uncertain road to recovery.












Samuel Parris (1653-1720) était le ministre (Révérend) puritain du village de Salem, Massachusetts pendant les procès des sorcières de Salem, ainsi que le père d'une des filles affligées, Elizabeth Parris, et l'oncle d'un autre - Abigail Williams.



Samuel est né à Londres, en Angleterre en 1653, fils d’un marchand de tissu Thomas Parris, qui avait également des intérêts dans la colonie de l'île de la Barbade. Quand Samuel grandit, il fut envoyé au Massachusetts pour étudier à Harvard. En 1673, alors qu'il était encore à l'université, son père est mort, le laissant à 20 ans avec une plantation à la Barbade. Après son diplôme, Parris déménagea dans l'île où il loua la plantation familiale de canne à sucre et s'installa à Bridgetown. Là, il s'est établi comme agent de crédit pour d'autres planteurs de sucre.


En 1680, après qu’un ouragan ait frappé la Barbade, une grande partie de sa propriété a été endommagée. Il a ensuite quitté l'île, en prenant avec lui deux esclaves, Tituba et John Indian. Il s'installe alors à Boston où il tente de nouveau de s'établir comme marchand. Il a acheté un quai et un entrepôt et a assisté à la première église de Boston, où il a rencontré Elizabeth Eldridge. Les deux se marieront bientôt et auront trois enfants, Thomas, Elisabeth et Susannah. Ses esclaves, Tituba et John Indian resteront  dans la maison. Insatisfait de la vie de marchand, Parris envisagea un changement de vocation et, en 1686, il commença à remplacer les ministres absents et à s'exprimer lors de rassemblements religieux informels.



Après la naissance de leur troisième enfant, le révérend Parris a commencé des négociations formelles avec Salem Village pour devenir le nouveau ministre du village. A cette époque, Salem Village était connu pour être un endroit difficile, décrit par les habitants des villes voisines comme ville à problème. Il avait déjà eu aussi trois ministres, qui étaient tous partis après avoir eu des problèmes avec la Congrégation. Bien que Parris soit au courant des conflits du village ayant eu lieu ces dernières années, ses croyances puritaines que chaque personne est responsable du suivi de la piété de son voisin l’a amené à sentir que le conflit était inévitable.


Le 18 juin 1689, lors d'une assemblée générale de tous les villageois, il fut convenu d'embaucher Samuel Parris, moyennant un salaire annuel de £ 66 et les villageois fourniraient du bois de chauffage pour l'église et le presbytère. Lors d'une réunion ultérieure, les villageois ont convenu qu'ils fourniraient également à Parris et ses héritiers, le presbytère du village, une grange et deux acres de terre. Parris a accepté et lui et sa famille ont immédiatement déménagé au village de Salem, s'installant dans le presbytère, et commençant ses devoirs ministériels ce même mois. Au presbytère, le révérend Parris a amené sa femme Elisabeth, sa fille Elisabeth, âgée de neuf ans, sa nièce de 11 ans, Abigail Williams, et ses esclaves Tituba et John Indian.


Le 19 novembre 1689, la charte de l'église de Salem Village fut finalement signée et le révérend Samuel Parris devint le premier ministre ordonné de Salem Village. Son ministère a commencé doucement; Mais, comme Parris a commencé à révéler ses croyances et traits de caractère, un certain nombre de villageois de Salem, y compris quelques membres de l'église, n'ont pas aimé ce qu'ils ont vu. Un ministre sérieux et dévoué, il a combiné son enthousiasme évangélique pour revitaliser la religion dans le village de Salem avec la rigidité psychologique et le conservatisme théologique.


Pendant que l'Église de Salem Towne et les Églises les plus puritaines de l'époque, élargissaient leurs normes pour qu’une personne deviennent membre de l'Église, Parris tenait lui  à  la rigide des normes strictes traditionnelles, qui exigeaient que les membres soient baptisés et fassent une déclaration publique d'éprouver la grâce libre de Dieu pour devenir des membres à part entière. La plupart des membres de de l’église du village étaient heureux avec le traditionalisme de Parris, qui a élevé leur statut en les distinguant nettement des membres ne faisant pas partie de l’église. Mais, une minorité dissidente a trouvé des alliés parmi les non-membres de l’église, qui ont constitué une partie importante et influente de la communauté de village de Salem.


Tout à coup, Parris se retrouve également au milieu des différends contractuels avec les membres du Conseil de l’église du Village  de Salem. Le Conseil a soutenu que le contrat, qui n’avait apparemment jamais été  officialisé, stipulait seulement  que Parris  jouissait du  presbytère et des terres tant qu’il était ministre,  alors que Parris pensait que le contrat accordé était un contrat de propriété pure et simple de la maison et des terres.
Dans le même temps, Parris s’apprêtait à remettre en état la maison de la réunion (l’église), correspondant à son nouveau statut comme une église pleine. Mais, pour beaucoup, cela a signifiait une église plus intrusive et plus cher que certains villageois ne le souhaitaient.


À l'automne de 1691, seulement deux ans après son ordination, l'orthodoxie rituelle de Parris, la disposition autoritaire et le contrat contesté avaient fait que le village et l'église une fois de plus entrent en frictions. La fréquentation de l'église a diminué et les responsables du village ont refusé de fournir du bois de chauffage pour chauffer l'église ou la maison de Parris. Les choses se sont aggravées quand un nouveau Comité des Cinq a été choisi par le village en octobre 1691, qui a annoncé son refus d’abandonner  la maison du ministère et  la terre à Parris ou de percevoir des impôts pour son salaire, laissant aux villageois de payer des  " contributions volontaires." Parris a ensuite demandé aux membres de l'église de déposer une plainte officielle auprès de la Cour du comté contre la négligence du comité envers l'église. Les combats entre factions ont également commencé à jouer dans ses sermons hebdomadaires comme une bataille entre Dieu et Satan.


Cet hiver-là, la fille de Samuel, Elizabeth Parris et sa cousine, Abigail Williams, commencèrent à faire des expériences dans la divination en se concentrant surtout sur leur futur statut social et leurs maris potentiels. Elles étaient promptes à partager leur jeu avec d'autres jeunes filles dans la région, même si la pratique de la divination était considérée comme une activité démoniaque. En janvier 1692, Elizabeth, âgée de neuf ans, semblait être consommée par une préoccupation secrète et oubliait les courses et était incapable de se concentrer. Elle commença alors à agir d'une manière étrange, aboyant comme un chien quand son père la réprimandait, criant sauvagement quand elle entendait la prière «Notre Père» et une fois, lança une Bible à travers la pièce. Après ces épisodes, elle sanglotait distraitement et parlait d'être damnée, peut-être à cause de sa pratique de la «divination».


Le révérend Samuel Parris croyait que la prière pouvait guérir son comportement étrange, mais ses efforts étaient inefficaces. En fait, ses actions se sont aggravées. Bientôt, elle contorsionnait son corps en des postures bizarres, répandant constamment des discours stupides et ridicules, et ayant généralement des crises. Le Révérend Parris a consulté d'autres ministres, qui ne voulaient pas expliquer ses actions. Mais, quand il l’a amené chez le médecin local, William Griggs, celui-ci a suggéré que sa maladie devait être le résultat de la sorcellerie. Parris a ensuite organisé des réunions de prière et des jours de jeûne pour tenter de soulager les symptômes d'Elizabeth. Mais, la frénésie c’est juste répandue. Bientôt, la cousine d'Elizabeth, Abigail Williams, a également eu des crises, suivie par certains de leurs amies, y compris Ann Putnam, Jr. et Mary Walcott. Puisque les victimes de sorcellerie étaient censées être les victimes d'un crime, la communauté s'est mise à chercher les auteurs. Le 29 février 1692, sous une interrogation intense des adultes, Elizabeth Parris et Abigail Williams nommèrent Sarah Good, Sarah Osborne et Tituba comme leurs bourreaux.


La prédication de Parris a eu une grande influence dans la création des divisions au sein du village qui ont contribué aux accusations de 1692. Pendant la crise, il a déclaré l'église assiégée par le Diable, qui était assisté par «méchants et des hommes réprouvés ». Parris a commencé à tracer des «lignes de combat» entre ceux qui l'ont soutenu et ceux qui ne l'ont pas soutenu, qui étaient, sans doute, les mêmes qu'il avait appelé «pervers et réprouvés». Les accusations contre les factions adverses du village de Salem ont commencé sérieusement et se sont rapidement propagées à d'autres villes voisines, y compris Andover, Beverly, Topsfield, Wenham et d'autres.


Lorsque les procès ont commencé, le révérend Samuel Parris pouvait déposer des plaintes, servir comme témoin, témoigner contre bon nombre de ceux qui ont été accusés, et parfois, servait de gardien pour les dossiers des événements. Àvant la fin de mai 1692, plus de 150 «sorcières» avaient été emprisonnées et, en septembre, 19 personnes avaient refusé d'avouer et avaient été pendues, et une autre avait été condamnée à être pressé à mort pour avoir refusé de témoigner. En octobre, cependant, les têtes plus froides ont commencé à l’emporter  et la cour a interdit «la preuve spectrale.» L'affaire ne se terminerait pas jusqu'à mai 1693, quand tous les accusés ont finalement été libérés de prison.


Lorsque L'hystérie était finalement terminé, Salem Village était encore divisée et beaucoup étaient  même plus mécontents du révérend Parris. Cependant, en 1695, deux ans après la fin des procès, Parris a recueilli encore une majorité de soutien à la ville. Mais, au fil du temps, les familles de ceux qui avaient été accusés, et surtout de ceux qui avaient été exécutés, allaient le pousser dehors. La famille de Rebecca Nurse et d’autres ont  directement  accusé Parris d'avoir fourni des noms à la cour, et beaucoup de gens avaient de grands doutes au sujet de sa place dans les procès. Certains villageois ont  portées des accusations contre lui pour son rôle  aux procès, l'amenant à présenter des excuses pour son erreur. La femme de Samuel est morte en 1696 à l'âge de 48 et est enterré dans le cimetière de Danvers.


En dépit de l'aversion intense de nombreux villageois de Salem, Parris est resté jusqu'en 1697, quand il a accepté un autre poste de prédicateur à Stow, Massachusetts. Il vivra plus tard à Watertown et Concord, où il a travaillé comme un commerçant et un détaillant autorisé.  En cours de route, il épousera en seconde noce Dorothy Noyes et le couple aura quatre enfants. Il a commencé à prêcher à Dunstable en 1708, où il a continué jusqu'à 1712. A partir de là, il a déménagé à Sudbury, où il a travaillé comme agriculteur et parfois, en tant que professeur d'école. Il est décédé à Sudbury le 27 Février 1720.

Parris a été remplacé par le révérend Joseph Green en 1697, un homme qui voulait vraiment guérir Salem village et a commencé son poste  sur la route longue et incertaine de la reprise.








_________________
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://mespassions.forumactif.com
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
ACCUATEURS, INSTIGATEURS ET SUPPORTER DES PROCES
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1
 Sujets similaires
-
» JUGEMENTS DERNIERS : LES PROCES PETAIN, NUREMBERG ET EICHMAN de Joseph Kessel
» [Marathon 2010] De quelle équipe êtes vous "Supporter Officiel " ?
» dur à supporter ..post-tarte !
» LE CHANT DE L'OISEAU DE NUIT (Tome 1) LE PROCES DE LA SORCIERE de Robert McCammon
» Comment faire pour supporter les attractions à sensations fortes???

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Le forum de l'histoire, des mystères, de l'insolites et du féérique :: LES SORCIERES DE SALEM :: LEGEND OF AMERICA-
Sauter vers: